Night Eating Syndrome: Is It Just Sleep That Is Disturbed?

Waking up in the middle of the night is an annoying event that most of us experience. Usually we are able to fall asleep again quickly, perhaps after drinking some water and/or making a trip to the bathroom. But for some, waking up is a signal to go into the kitchen and eat: a bowl of cereal, a peanut butter sandwich, or a dish of ice cream. And unhappily, going back to bed after the night time snack does not ensure that the remainder of the night will be restful. Waking may occur once again, or even several times during the rest of the night, and is always accompanied by eating. The next morning, the night time eater has no appetite for breakfast and may not eat for hours.

When the pattern of awakening and eating occurs regularly, it is defined as a type of eating disorder called Night Eating Syndrome (“NES”) described first by Albert Stunkard in l955. Dr. Stunkard was a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania when he first put forth the criteria for diagnosing this poorly understood behavior. Simply eating leftover pie or pizza at midnight is not sufficient to meet the diagnosis, because people with NES consume about 25% of their total daily calories after the evening meal. The food can be consumed in the evening before sleep and/or during nocturnal awakenings. Those with NES suffer from insomnia at least four or five times a week and believe that they will not be able to go back to sleep unless they eat. Finally, if they have mood disturbances like depression and anxiety, their moods will worsen as the evening progresses.

Interestingly, as Stunkard points out in a paper he wrote on the subject almost fifty years later, people who engage in frequent night time eating are not necessarily obese, although it is a risk factor for obesity. Because they are unlikely to eat during the early part of the day, (skipping breakfast and delaying lunch) their total daily intake may be appropriate. On the other hand, many who are seeking help for their obesity often fail to report nighttime eating episodes. Plus, they are rarely asked about it, so it is not known to what extent this type of eating contributes to weight gain.

The inability to sleep through the night, or to do so with only infrequent awakenings of short duration, is certainly associated with NES, but is it the cause? Many people have insomnia, but they do not eat their way through every period of nighttime wakefulness. If the food eaten helps put the eater back to sleep, this would explain their seeking food once they wake up. But it is hard to find studies that test whether the foods chosen in order to put the insomniac to sleep actually work. Moreover, in a study that examined sleep cycles of NES subjects and controls, no difference was found in the duration of sleep, although the former did awaken earlier in the night and more often.

Perhaps the syndrome is not caused by disordered sleep, but by something else. Current research suggests someone with NES is not eating to go back to sleep, but rather waking up because of hunger. The “hunger” hormone ghrelin, which normally is secreted during the day when we normally feel hungry, seems to peak late in the evening and into the night in NES sufferers. Thus they may be awakening because of ghrelin-potentiated hunger.

A solution has been to reset the pattern of ghrelin secretion back to normal by exposing the patient to light very early in the morning. Anyone who has traveled east across enough time zones to feel out of sync and out of sorts during the first couple of days, knows the feeling of being forced to sleep and eat on another time zone’s timetable. It is hard to be hungry for breakfast when it is only 3 am back home, and it is hard to find food when you wake up hungry at 2 am because it is now 7 pm back home. If you stay in the new time zone long enough, your eating and sleeping hormones adjust. This is what researchers hope to accomplish for the night eaters using bright lights to make ghrelin levels high during daylight rather than at night.

Melatonin is also being tried because some studies have found that this sleep hormone is not as high as it should be in the late evening, and perhaps this is why it is so easy for the night eaters to wake up. There is a time-released melatonin preparation containing the low recommended dose of melatonin (0.3 mg); whether it might prevent frequent awakenings has not yet been tested. Anxiety and depression are also linked with NES, but it is unclear if they are the cause or consequence of disrupted sleep.

It is not unusual to wake up at 3 am and be assaulted with the worries that were successfully repressed 12 hours earlier. If one were prone to depression and anxiety, would these mood disorders cause sleep disturbances leading to frequent awakenings or, if awake, prevent the individual from falling back asleep unless something is eaten? Stunkard recommended antidepressants that increase serotonin activity to decrease anxiety and depression and calm the individual back into sleep. But a remedy that would help the sleep, as well as hunger and mood disturbances, is more simple and natural: a cup of low-fat, mildly sweet breakfast cereal eaten upon nighttime awakening. The carbohydrate will increase serotonin thus inducing relaxation, satiety and a more tranquil mood.

If the cereal is in a cup by the bed, it can be eaten without leaving it (as long as there are no crumbs.)

References

“The night-eating syndrome; a pattern of food intake among certain obese patients,” Stunkard, A.J.; Grace, W.; Wolff, H.,The American Journal of Medicine. 1955: 19: 78–86

“Two forms of disordered eating in obesity: binge eating and night eating,” Stunkard, A. and Allison, K.. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2003, 27: 1-12

“Circadian eating and sleeping patterns in the night eating syndrome,” O”Reardon, J., Ringel, B., Dinges, D., et al, Obes Res. 2004; 12:1789-96

If Your Valentine Sweetheart is on a Diet, Should You Gift Chocolates?

Valentine ‘s Day is a sweet (pun intended) holiday. It comes in the middle of the winter doldrums; Christmas is long past and spring is nowhere to be seen. But the problem is that it also comes about six weeks into the weight-loss program many started after New Year’s Day.

“Give something to show your love,” we are told in a doughnut shop advertisement featuring heart- shaped pink doughnuts covered with white icing and pink sprinkles. Shelves in gourmet chocolate stores are filled with pinky-red, heart-shaped boxes decorated with tiny flowers; the boxes contain melt-in-your-mouth creamy chocolate that should be guaranteed to melt the heart of the recipient.  Russell Stover chocolates that are filed with hidden flavors revealed only when bitten into are waiting to be bought and sent to the relatives who remember the candy with fondness. M&M’s sport pink chocolate shells, while heart-shaped sugar candies waiting to cause instant tooth decay call to the drug store shopper who came in only looking for shampoo.

Not to be left out, bakeries feature several-layered heart-shaped cakes to be consumed with a glass or two of champagne.

To be sure, commercial romance for Valentine’s Day is not limited to food. Flowers are a welcome brightness in the gloom of early February and jewelry, especially diamond engagement rings, do not contain calories. Gifts of self-indulgence that the recipient may not get for her or himself, such as a massage, spa treatments, pedicures, and/or manicures, are also calorie-free and thoughtful.

However, sweet foods, especially chocolate, seem to be the most persistent symbol of romantic thoughts or intentions. Perhaps because for centuries chocolate has been considered an aphrodisiac. There is no scientific evidence for this, and even if it were true, there would be no reason to assume that chocolate consumed on Valentine’s Day has a greater impact on sexual arousal than if it were consumed on any other day. Perhaps if chocolate is wrapped in a heart-shaped box, it has more of an impact; nonetheless, this certainly has not been tested.

Giving a gift of chocolate also has its perils. What if the message it conveys has less to do with romantic intentions and more to do with the body image of the recipient? Give a pound of chocolate to someone skinny and it may convey the thought, “You need to gain some weight.”  Present that heart-shaped box to a chubby recipient and it can unintentionally convey the thought that, “You are fat already, so what difference does another pound of chocolate make?” instead of, “I like you the way you are.” Can you give chocolate to someone in the older generation who may be overweight, developing diabetes, or dealing with orthopedic problems because of excess weight?

Then there is the dieter. The continuing popularity of low or zero carbohydrate diets puts chocolate on the forbidden food list. The butterfat would be fine, and the more expensive the chocolate, the more butterfat it contains. But the sugar content that makes chocolate edible (otherwise it would taste like bitter cooking chocolate) would ruin the diet of anyone who is following a ketogenic diet in which fat, not carbohydrate, is used by the brain and body for energy.

But for those who are counting calories or the equivalent in food exchanges, there is good news. Small amounts of chocolate have fewer calories than they seem to have, given their luxurious taste and mouthfeel. A quick scan of Godiva, a popular gourmet brand of chocolate, reveals a lower calorie count for their chocolate than one would assume. Admittedly the actual pieces of chocolate are not large, maybe one or two bites. Still, you can eat four dark chocolate truffles for about 180 calories, and three pieces of assorted Belgian chocolates for 190 calories. A Lindt chocolate ball has 75 calories. To put this in perspective, a glass of champagne has 95 calories, an eight-ounce serving of fat-free yogurt around 80-90 calories, and 10 almonds, 70 calories. So certainly presenting your Valentine gift of chocolate to a dieter should not be a problem; one or two pieces of chocolate will not retard weight loss or cause the diet to fail.

But of course that is the problem. You can’t buy prepackaged chocolates wrapped in the colors of Valentine’s Day in amounts smaller than twenty or so pieces. Thus the recipient has to confront the problem of how to manage the consumption of the rest of the chocolate after February 14.  A highly disciplined dieter will be able to restrict consumption of a luscious piece of chocolate to one or possibly two a day. But this kind of restriction is not easy to accomplish, especially in the middle of the diet. And the romantic associations with the chocolate will be quickly dissipated when the dieter finds a “gift” of pounds after devouring the rest of the package.

One solution is to buy only one or two pieces of gourmet chocolate from the store; the chocolate can be boxed in the same fancy wrapping as would be used for a larger amount. But in this time of online rather than in person shopping, locating such shops and having the time to go to one seems much too inconvenient. Moreover, the dieter may misinterpret intentions behind the gift thinking that the giver:

1) Is cheap;

2) Thinks I am fat;

3) Thinks I will gobble everything in a bigger box; and therefore

4) Wants me to stay fat.

Maybe people should stick to flowers or diamonds.

 

 

 

Will the Bacteria in Sauerkraut Make You Thin?

Most of us pay less attention to the many colonies of bacteria living in our intestinal tract than we do to the possibility that there may be colonies living on Mars. Recent research suggests it is time to do so. Our gut contains densely packed colonies of bacteria that affect not only digestion and diseases of the intestinal tract, but also our immune system and, according to some research, perhaps hunger, weight, mood, and athletic performance as well.

According to an article by Drs. Zhang and Yang, our intestinal tract contains more than 1000 or more bacterial species. These varieties of bacteria, of which we are usually unaware unless we have “tummy troubles,” function to assist in digestion,  particularly of high fiber fruits and vegetables. They break down the chemical composition of fiber, thus transforming the indigestible carbohydrate to substances, as well as short chain fatty acids, which are used for energy. Our bacteria are also gatekeepers, helping the intestinal immune system deal with foreign antigens or proteins when they enter our body. Intestinal bacteria contain enzymes that make vitamin K, a critical component in the formation of blood clots. Intestinal bacteria also synthesize other vitamins: biotin, vitamin B12, folic acid, and thiamine.

That the bacterial flora can change is well known to anyone who has taken antibiotics for several days, and then confronted with less than optimal intestinal functioning. The antibiotic wipes out so-called healthy bacteria, and sometimes it takes several days or longer to restore normal functioning.

Zhang and Yang’s report asserts that diet also causes significant changes in gut bacteria. Consumption of a high-fat, high-sugar diet causes unhealthy bacteria to flourish. Conversely, diets low in those nutrients, but high in fiber, bring back a better class of bacteria. For somewhat obvious reasons, most of these studies are done on laboratory animals, since they require samples of intestinal bacteria found in the feces, and it is hard to find human volunteers for these studies.

Is it possible that our bacteria can affect our mood? Some scientists suggest that we can reduce anxiety and depression if we have the good kind of bacteria. This is based on evidence that intestinal bacteria make neurotransmitters, the chemicals that transmit messages in the brain. But it seems unlikely that our gut will control our mood since neurotransmitters made in the gut never get into the brain. (But interestingly, we do talk about our gut having feelings, i.e., our language is full of expressions that suggest our gut has moods: a feeling in my gut, gut response, gut reaction, etc…)

Intestinal microbes may affect the amount of ghrelin, a hormone that tells the brain whether we are hungry. But if so, no one has figured out what species of intestinal bacteria may do this—or whether they will make us feel so full we will eat less. Now athletes are allowing their intestinal bacteria to be analyzed to see if they differ from those of sedentary folk. According to an article in a recent issue of Outside magazine, some super-fit athletes do have varieties of bacteria not found in non-athletes. However, since they tend to follow extremely healthy, low-fat diets, is it their diets or their incredible athletic feats that change the bacteria? (Or, do the bacteria contribute to their athletic success?)

Much more research has to be carried out to show that intestinal bacteria are having a direct effect on hunger, athletic performance, or obesity before we can start manipulating our bacterial colonies to bring about certain desirable health effects.  To be sure, there are some studies now gaining interest, that have tested the effects of fecal transplants in which bacteria from healthy volunteers may be transplanted to the intestines of those suffering from an intestinal disease like irritable bowel syndrome. These studies are showing promise in helping people whose intestinal disorders do not respond to conventional therapies.

In the meantime, while we are waiting for more science to support some of the claims that our gut bacteria can alter our heath for better or for worse, we are told to load our intestinal tract with good bacteria. Supposedly, these good bacteria can be eaten if we consume fermented foods such as sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), miso and tempeh (fermented soybeans), kimchi (a Korean dish of fermented cabbage with hot spices), kombucha tea (a fermented drink made with tea, sugar, bacteria, and yeast). and kefir (a fermented yogurt drink). These foods contain probioticsor living bacteria, that when ingested populate our intestinal tract with good microbes. Pasteurization will kill the microbes, both good and bad, which is why many yogurts and canned sauerkraut are not on the list.

But there is a problem. Although scientists can identify many of the species of good intestinal bacteria, they are not listed on a package of tempeh or a bottle of kombucha. Moreover, how many bacteria are we actually eating? Probiotics may differ in their content of something called CFUs, or colony-forming units. CFUs describe the density of viable bacteria in a product. According to Dr. Shekhar K. Challa, a gastroenterologist who wrote Probiotics For Dummies, quantitating the CFUs of probiotics in most food products is almost impossible. CFUs are not listed under calories or any other place on the food label.

So will eating unpasteurized sauerkraut make enough good bacteria to make you thin (that is, if good bacteria will make you thin)? Probably not. But sauerkraut contains almost no calories, and chopping a cabbage, mixing it with salt and watching it turn into sauerkraut is something to do on a snowy afternoon. And after you eat it, its bacteria will have a happy home in you.

References

(“Effects of a high fat diet on intestinal microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases,” World Journal of Gastroenterology 2016, Oct 28; 22(40): 8905–8909) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5083795/

Don’t Avoid Exercise Because It Makes You Hungry

Among the many kinds of advice given to those who are trying to lose weight, exercise usually ranks just below diet. But just as weight-loss advice can be contradictory and confusing, so too are the recommendations for exercise. No one disputes the benefits of physical activity on everything from improved digestion to better cognition. The adverse effects of ignoring the prescription to move ones body are just as compelling: no exercise equates to bad sleep, bad bones, and bad mood, among other unpleasant symptoms.

But many dieters and weight maintainers are reluctant to exercise because they fear the effect on their hunger. Exercise seems like an ineffective, and indeed unworkable, way of losing weight when post-exercise appetite may lead to eating many more calories than those worked off. Anecdotal reports by dieters of feeling ravenous after a stint on the treadmill or weekly Zumba class supports the erroneous belief that exercise while dieting should be avoided to prevent overeating.

Curiously, highly-trained athletes (who, of course, don’t have to worry about their weight) are the least likely to want to eat after their highly intense exercise routines are completed. In a study published a few years ago on appetite among female athletes, the scientists found that intense exercise actually decreased subjective hunger. Moreover, ghrelin, the hormone in the gut and blood that regulates hunger, was decreased and another hormone that shuts off appetite, increased. (“No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women,” Howe, S., Hand, T., Larson-Meyer, D., Austin, K. et al Nutrients, 2016; 8 ) The same effect had been found earlier in studies carried out with male endurance athletes.

Since most of us are not likely to devote a good portion of our lives to training for competitive athletic events, we cannot rely on this for suppressing appetite after exercise. However, it seems that even unfit obese men may also experience a decrease in hunger after intense exercise, at least for 30 minutes after the exercise session completed. Whether they overate several hours later was not reported. (“The Effects of Concurrent Resistance and Endurance Exercise on Hunger Feelings and PYY in Obese Men,” Asrami, A., Faraji, H., Jalali, S., International Journal of Sport Studies, 2014 4; 729-)

But one may ask: what is wrong with being hungry after physical activity? Isn’t hunger a natural and inevitable response of the body after calories are used up? A Food Network show featuring life on a ranch in some unnamed cattle-raising part of the country often features recipes for the “hungry” family and ranch hands after a day of especially hard work. It would be absurd for the workers to avoid physical labor just because they are very hungry when they return home to eat a substantial meal.

But most of us have traveled far from the natural progression of physical activity to hunger to eating to a return of energy, and thus being able to work again. The “I am so hungry that I could eat a horse” (or whatever animal comes to mind) statement after hours of manual labor or recreational physical activity seems to many like a prescription for weight gain, rather than the way nature intended us to feel.

But it is not. Hunger is natural. The hormones causing us to want to eat are there to make sure we do so in order to live. If hunger disappears, as is the case for some with late stage Alzheimer’s disease, the individual will not survive unless others make sure to feed the patient.
In short, we should stop being afraid of being hungry. Hunger means our bodies need food the way being thirsty means our bodies need water. How we satisfy our hunger is what we have to improve if we want to stop gaining weight and begin to lose it. Just as we could, but should not, satisfy our thirst by drinking gallons of champagne or sugary sodas; we should satisfy our hunger not by consuming junk food, but by eating foods that not only supply calories (to replace those used up in exercise) but also needed nutrients into our bodies.

Dieters are told to try to eat fewer calories than needed so the calories in their stored fat will be mobilized to make up the difference. But unless the dieter goes on a drastically low-calorie diet, or a diet that eliminates certain categories of foods, it is possible to eat less, satisfy hunger, and still lose weight. We often eat beyond feeling full, that is, beyond the cessation of hunger; this is why we eat dessert. If eating stops when hunger disappears—even if all the food has not—weight can be lost.
Should you eat before or after exercise? It depends on your body. Some cannot exercise after eating and will eat breakfast after, rather than before, working out in the morning. Others find that they don’t have the energy to play tennis or go hiking unless they have eaten. Therefore, they will eat enough to give their muscles fuel for their workout, but not so much that they feel too stuffed to move.

Sometimes during long bouts of exercise, such as a long bike ride or hike, the first sign that the body needs food is not hunger but fatigue. I remember once when I was cross-country skiing all day, I become too exhausted to move my skis up a hill to get back to the lodge. As I stepped outside the track to let a woman behind me pass, she handed me an energy bar. “You need food,” she said. “Eat this.“ She was right. Within a few minutes I felt my fatigue lift, and I was able to continue moving.

We are told to be in touch with our bodies. Exercising, being hungry, and eating healthfully are excellent ways of communicating with ourselves.

 

 

 

Is the US Becoming More Obese Because of Medication?

Despite a blizzard of weight-loss programs, touting novel fat-reducing foods, and innovative exercise devices, the country is getting fatter and fatter. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that nearly 4 in 10 U.S adults, according to their body mass index, can be classified as obese. Obesity is not evenly distributed among the states. The losers; i.e. the thinnest states, are Colorado, Hawaii, Massachusetts, and D.C. The gainer is West Virginia where almost 40% of adults are obese.

We have been becoming heavier for so many decades that we forget how thin we were as a country 80 or more years ago. It is only when viewing newsreels of the first half of the 20th century in which most adults look extremely thin that you realize what we now consider thin was considered normal weight back then.

The same old reasons are brought out yearly to explain why we, and indeed the rest of the world, is getting fatter: junk food, sugary drinks, dependence on motorized transport rather than our two feet, humongous restaurant portions, intestinal flora that make our bodies store fat, too much time on electronic devices, and too little time in the gym.

Might our growing obesity be related to the weight gain after smoking withdrawal? Weight gain is common among ex-smokers, and studies as reported by the National Bureau of Economic Research (Sharon Begley, “Gut Check”) suggest that it may be 11-12 pounds on average. But a close examination of who gains the most weight indicates that smokers with the lowest BMI are most likely to gain the most, and 11 or 12 pounds is not enough weight gain to make them obese.

Could medications used to treat mental disorders be another, mostly overlooked cause of national weight gain? That psychotropic drugs—the medications used to treat depression, anxiety, bipolar disorderschizophrenia and other mental diseases—cause weight gain is established. Sometimes the weight gain is only a few pounds, stops after a month or two, and is lost as soon as the treatment ends. But many drugs cause substantial weight gain because the patient experiences a relentless urge to eat. Moreover, to the chagrin, indeed horror of some patients, stopping the medications does not always cause weight loss even with dieting and exercise.

Data on the use of psychotropic drugs comes from a 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey discussed in a Scientific American article by Sara Miller.  One in six Americans is taking a psychotropic drug, although not all are being prescribed for mental illness. There have also been many studies showing that depression itself is linked to future obesity. A common depression, Seasonal Affective Disorder, is diagnosed in part by the overeating and weight gain of patients during the increased darkness of winter. Often the depression of PMS and pre-menopause is accompanied by overeating and weight gain as well.

Yet in the list of causes for our increasing girth, reasons such as genes, inflammation, bad gut bacteria and bread are more likely to be found than the weight-gaining potential of depression and the drugs that treat it.

Where are the weight-loss programs specifically designed to help those whose overeating is caused by lack of sunlight, or hormones affecting appetite control centers in the brain, or drugs that hijack control over satiety? Where are the support services for those who are embarrassed to go to the gym because their medications have turned their formerly fit and slim body into a much heavier one?  Recently someone who has been struggling to lose the weight gained on her medication for obsessive-compulsive disorder told me that her dietician put her on a low- carbohydrate diet. “I was craving carbohydrates all the time,” she told me, “so the dietician figured the easiest way to take care of that problem was to remove them from my diet. She did not realize that my medication had caused the cravings even though I told her. And since I couldn’t stop my drugs, I just craved bread and pasta so much on her diet that I began to binge.”

 

This story is typical in that this patient was not seen as needing specialized weight-loss help because her weight gain was the result of a drug, and not related to emotional issuesor an inability to make healthy food choices. Moreover, the dietician’s advice to remove carbohydrates showed lack of knowledge on the effect of eating carbohydrates on serotonin synthesis. Serotonin levels drop when carbohydrates are not consumed and often lead to a worsening of the obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, or other mental disorders.

How long is it going to be before weight-loss professionals acknowledge that many of the obese in the United States are that way because of their medications? How long will it be before thought, labor, and money are put into programs to address their special needs?

Will 2018 bring about needed innovations in weight-loss therapy for these individuals, or will we just become fatter?

Will Reducing Your Dress Size Reduce Your Bone Size?

“She got so thin!” a friend whispered to me, pointing to a mutual friend we had not seen for several months. The thin friend came over, and when complimented on her size, she told us she had lost weight following a diet than eliminated most food groups. “It was easy to lose weight,” she said, “because all I could eat were lean proteins and vegetables. I think I will stay on this diet forever!”

“You might want to add some dairy products to your diet,” I murmured. “You know, osteoporosis and all that.”

“Oh, I get plenty of calcium from vegetables,” she answered, “and anyway, dairy is fattening.”

Feeling like the bad witch who predicts dire consequences, I restrained myself from pointing out that she was a perfect storm for losing bone mass and breaking bones. She was beyond her menopause, which meant that the protective effect of estrogen on bone density was no longer functioning. It was unlikely that she did weight-bearing exercise to increase muscle mass and subsequently bone mass. Her arms and legs showed no obvious muscular development; they were visually just skinny tubes. Vitamin D intake, the last piece of the triad of interventions that support bone density, was probably also lacking, as the foods she ate were not fortified with vitamin D.

At her age—she was almost seventy—she should have been consuming about 1200 mg of calcium a day and 600 IU (international units) of vitamin D to maintain her bone mass.  But because of her weight-loss diet, she wasn’t.

After a several month struggle to lose weight, it seems unfair that my now thinner friend is vulnerable to this debilitating disease. But she fits the profile of people likely to develop osteoporosis even without her weight loss. (Osteoporosis can occur in both men and women but women are more likely to have it. White and Asian women are most at risk that also increases with age.) If she had a family history of osteoporosis, smoked, consumed excessive amounts of alcohol, and had been severely underweight as an adolescent when bone mass is rapidly expanding, she would be facing an even greater chance of developing the disease.

It is not possible to diagnosis osteoporosis without a bone density scan. Despite her skinny appearance, her bones may have been fine. But the only way to tell is to have a type of x-ray called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA). Many women ten years or so beyond menopause will have the test so their physician can have a base line measurement of their bone strength. If the results indicate that osteoporosis may be developing, then the patient will be told to consume calcium-rich foods like milk, cottage cheese, yogurt or some vegetables such as kale…and also may be told to take a vitamin D supplement. Exercise is also important to promote bone density.

There are several drugs now available prescribed for osteoporosis but they have substantial side effects. The drugs are called bisphosphonates. Fosamax and Actonel are taken daily or weekly and another, Boniva, is taken monthly. One, Reclast, is given intravenously once a year; for those who have the early signs of the disease, once every two years. Most of the side effects, i.e., nausea, are tolerable, but a minority may developed osteonecrosis of the jaw or jawdeath. Fosamax and Boniva have been associated with this problem in which the bones in the jaw don’t heal after a minor injury like having a tooth pulled. Another equally rare side effect is a particular kind of fracture in the femur, the long bone of the leg.

Why drugs that promote bone growth and density should have the opposite effect on specific bony areas in the body is not yet known.The incidence is 1 in 1,000. It happened to an acquaintance of mine who had been taking one of the bisphosphonates.  She had a dental procedure, and a few weeks later experienced severe jaw pain that was finally diagnosed as osteonecrosis. Now she was faced not only with osteoporosis, but also the fact that she could no longer take the drug that was supposed to halt it.

Preventing, or at least decreasing, the possibility of developing osteoporosis has to begin in adolescence but it is hard, if not impossible, to convince an 18 year-old to drink more or any milk or eat more, or any, yogurt or cottage cheese or kale. The American Academy of Pediatrics has warned that children are not consuming enough calcium during puberty when most bone growth occurs. Young women who are anorectic, or because of excessive exercise and low body fat stop menstruating, are at risk for developing bone loss at a young age. Teens should be getting 1000 to 1200 mg of calcium daily. This amount of calcium is not difficult to obtain with fat-free or low-fat dairy products, or calcium-fortified milk substitutes like soy or almond milk, which are also fortified with vitamin D.  Unfortunately, a diet drink, instead of milk, is often the beverage of choice.

It seems as if the most compelling motivation to consume enough calcium and vitamin D in an effort to prevent osteoporosis is having a relative who fractured a hip or wrist because of this disease. There has to be a better way of promoting concern about this problem than the broken hip of an aunt. Bone density tests are expensive, time consuming and rarely offered to patients before menopause. What is needed is a simple, inexpensive test that detects the early stages of the disease, so nutritional intervention can start decades before the disorder develops—and perhaps an ad campaign showing that life can be “magical” after drinking milk.

 

Losing Weight in a Weight-Loss Resort: Will It Stay Off?

The New York Times recently reported on the change of ownership of one of the better-known weight loss/fitness resorts, Canyon Ranch. The article described the resort’s comprehensive program for those who want to lose weight and improve their fitness. Like many other facilities frequented by those who can afford both the very high price and the time off from work, Canyon Ranch offers more than well-prepared low-calorie food and exercise opportunities that include hikes, exercise classes, a fitness center, and individual training. Massages, lectures on stress-reduction/mindfulness, consultations with nutritionists and physicians, and even wrinkle-reducing treatments prepare the guests for entry into the real world in a much-improved physical and mental state. Sometimes people will stay at facilities like Canyon Ranch or others such as Hilton Head for weeks if they have a considerable amount of weight to lose. Some places stress hours of strenuous exercise and all restrict portion size and variety of food. No alcohol, of course, is allowed.

It is hard to obtain information on whether, after returning home, participants are able to maintain their lower weight, increased fitness, and decreased stress. The article mentioned that at least half of the people who go to Canyon Ranch have gone there before; one woman had visited the facility more than 100 times. No information was provided as to whether she needed to return frequently to maintain her weight and fitness status, or because she simply loved the facility or both.

The transition from staying in a facility detached from the realities of daily life (some forbid the use of electronic devices, television, and newspapers) to the real world may jolt the individual out of his or her newly found healthy lifestyle and make the return to old eating and exercise habits unavoidable. The weight-loss resorts don’t have satellite ‘drop-in centers‘ to reinforce what was learned and practiced while participating in the residential program. Few can maintain the four or five hours of daily exercise in which they engaged while at the resort; at least, not without giving up their day job. Reproducing the low-calorie meals with their emphasis on vegetables, grains, and lentils takes more effort than ordering takeout. And eating away from home at work, meetings, social occasions, and while traveling limit further the ability to obtain the foods offered at the weight-loss facility.

In short, taking on and keeping new habits requires time and effort. Plunging immediately back into the life led before going to these weight-loss resorts may shatter the new lifestyle acquired there.

People whose weight-loss efforts begin at home with dieting, and perhaps some exercise, are familiar from the very beginning of their diet with the struggles they must overcome to lose weight. They are dealing with all the stress triggers- temptations to overeat, work, family matters, exhaustion and lack of time, that may have contributed to their gaining weight.

Those who opt for stomach reduction surgery face an additional struggle because they cannot overeat without making themselves sick, and yet may also face all the factors that caused their weight gain. In contrast, people whose path to better weight and fitness starts in the otherworldly atmosphere of a residential weight loss and fitness facility are helped enormously by the elimination of triggers to overeating.

That is, until they leave.

However, there could be an enduring positive effect to losing weight and becoming more fit as a result of participating in a residential weight-loss facility. Success at seeing oneself thinner, even if it is only by a couple of pounds, and gaining stamina and strength, could motivate and reinforce further weight loss and fitness efforts. Many people don’t start diets or refuse to do any physical activity because they assume they will fail, at one or the other, or both. Stories of people self-identified as unfit, who go to one of the more physically demanding weight-loss programs and find themselves able to hike four or five hours a day, and then participate in hours more of physical training, are often shocked at their ability to do so. People who at home have not been able to give up their high-calorie foods and instead resist eating “healthful” foods, learn to enjoy varieties of grains and vegetables at these facilities and may try to continue eating these foods when they return home.

Could they have initiated these activities and changes in food choices without going to a weight-loss resort? Of course. But at home, they have a choice not to. At the resort, they either do or do not eat what they are served and participate in often grueling physical activity programs, or drop out of the program.

Most adults will never have the opportunity to go to a resort where food, physical activity, stress, sleep, and pampering are designed to make them feel optimally healthy. But might it be possible to take some of the effective programs at these facilities, such as healthful menu selections, opportunities for recreational exercise, e.g., hiking, stress reduction techniques, and introduce them into the workplace for everyone?

These methods of weight loss and fitness seem to be reserved for the few who can afford them. But like many things in our society, from indoor plumbing to cell phones, eventually they become available for most. Perhaps someday, strategies to eat healthful foods, maintain a normal weight, and achieve fitness will be available without staying in a weight-loss resort.

Will Watering Your Stomach Increase or Decrease Food Intake?

His water glass at dinner needed constant refilling, and I was worried that he had some sort of metabolic condition. But that was not the case. My relative by marriage said he always gulped water with every bite because it decreased his need to chew his food. “I swallow faster so I can eat faster,” he told me. Growing up in a family where there was competition for seconds, he learned that if he was the first to clean his plate, he got the remainder of the food on the table. The habit never left him.

Using water to lubricate swallowing is also behind the success of competitive eaters. Such people’s ability to consume enormous amounts of food in short periods of time made overeating into a sport. They train their stomachs to accept 30 hot dogs or chicken wings in the amount of time it takes to unfold a napkin. An interview with Yasir Salem, a competitive overeater ranked #10 in world competition by Erin McCarthy on the Internet site, “Mental Floss,” revealed his use of water in his training. He stretches his stomach by drinking daily a gallon of water after eating several pounds of a bulky vegetable, e.g., broccoli. And during a competition, he dunks hot dog rolls into warm water to soften them, so they can be swallowed quickly and with little chewing.

Competitive overeaters, as well as members of a family competing for the last chicken leg, are not the only ones who use water to eat quickly. Binge eaters will also drink water or other liquids to make it easy to consume large amounts of food in a small period of time. Indeed, many of us probably drink water or soda with our food when we find ourselves needing to finish eating in a hurry.

Drinking water with food to increase the amount of food eaten contradicts general wisdom about the use of water during a meal to decrease food intake. The use of water to fill up the stomach before the meal begins has been recommended for decades. ”Drink one or two large glasses of water before you sit down to eat,” say most weight-loss advisers, “and you will find that you can’t put much food in your stomach.” This is contradicted by Mr. Salem, who told his interviewer that he drinks a gallon of water before starting the eating competition, to effectively flush out his digestive system and make it ready for large quantities of food.

Similarly, drinking water with every bite of food, or at least after two or three bites, is strongly recommended as a way of slowing food intake. If, as the theory goes, you have to put down your fork or spoon, pick up your water glass, take a sip or two, put down the water glass, pick up the eating utensil and start eating again, the rate of food intake will slow considerably. Unlike my relative or Mr. Salem, the food is presumably chewed and swallowed before the water is imbibed. The water is not a lubricant to make swallowing faster and easier, but instead as a “time-out” from putting more food in the mouth.

Drinking more water also completes the end of the meal. If the plate is cleaned, but the eater does not feel full, diet coaches recommend drinking one or two large glasses of water at the end of the meal to convey the sensation of fullness. Carbonated water may work even better because if enough bubbles are swallowed, the stomach feels bloated and incapable of receiving more food. Carbonated drinks such as beer or sugar-filled sodas are not recommended because they deliver excess calories.

Obviously water can increase or decrease food intake depending on how it is incorporated into the eating process. And since most people attempting to lose weight are not going to be competing for seconds or entering an eating competition, drinking water before, during, or after the meal will, hopefully, decrease food intake. The water intake between bites is supposed to slow eating sufficiently so the brain will signal to the eater to stop before the stomach is totally filled up with more food than necessary.

But curiously, this seemingly innocuous recommendation has met with some resistance by those who claim that drinking water with a meal decreases the ability of the stomach to digest food. Water will dilute the enzymes in the saliva that start the process of digestion, and then further dilute the stomach enzymes that work to break the food down more before sending it to the small intestine; so claim the anti-water folk. Although debunked thoroughly by scientists, the recommendation to avoid water during a meal continues to circulate.

One of the problems with relying on water to confer satisfaction and fullness after consuming less food than desired is that water doesn’t stay in the stomach very long. It passes through much more quickly than food and, once gone, may leave a sense that now there is room for more food. If the eater wants to eat less without using will power to do so, then the most natural, drug-free way is to increase the serotonin levels in the brain. This is accomplished by eating a pre-meal snack of about 20 grams of a starchy carbohydrate such as a small roll. Twenty minutes later, the brain will make new serotonin and this neurotransmitter will convey a sense of fullness or satiety to the roll eater.

Starting the meal with the feeling of not being very hungry is helpful to slow your eating. If you are feeling somewhat full, you are more likely to eat slowly and eat less—and leave the seconds to someone else

 

Could Being Obese Make You Lose Your Teeth?

Having one’s teeth cleaned is not as bad as undergoing a root canal procedure, but certainly not as pleasant as getting a manicure. However, it does give one time to think of the implications of not doing so frequently, and the importance of carrying out the in-between cleaning tasks such as brushing, flossing and not eating caramel apples. Many of us may be not as compulsive about doing so as our dentist would like, but if we are also obese there is a greater cost to the health of our teeth and gums if the basic requirements of good dental hygiene are ignored.

No one disputes the adverse effects of consuming simple sugar on tooth decay. Ideally, if we indulge in eating or drinking sugar (as in soda or juice), we should race to the sink and brush our teeth immediately.  Dentists see the unfortunate consequences of not doing so, especially among those whose weight was gained by frequent consumption of sugar-rich snacks and drinks. Very few people will stop in the middle of a chocolate chip cookie or ice cream binge to floss and brush their teeth.

Obesity puts teeth and gums at risk for other reasons as well. Gastroesophageal reflux (aka acid reflux or heartburn) tends to be common, and causes teeth to be in contact with acid from the stomach, thereby contributing to the breakdown of teeth enamel. If the obesity is associated with depression or other mood disorders, the medications used to treat these disorders often leave the mouth extremely dry. The absence of saliva is also associated with dental decay. (Obesity Complicates Dental Health – Be Proactive!” Obesity Action Coalition, Stillwell, D.)

Patients who choose bariatric surgery to reduce the size of their stomach may be even more vulnerable to dental problems. Often vomiting occurs after this stomach surgery if too much food is put in the now tiny digestive organ. As with acid reflux, the teeth are coated with stomach acid, and enamel demineralization may result.  Moreover, according to Stillwell, an increased craving for sweets has been seen after surgery along with a significant tooth sensitivity that may make exposure to water or pressure uncomfortable. Patients who were not diligent about caring for their teeth before surgery are not likely to improve their dental hygiene afterwards, unless the importance of doing so is stressed.

Complicating care of the teeth and gums for someone struggling with obesity is this unpleasantness of attempting to fit an oversized body into a dental chair sized for smaller bodies. For someone with morbid obesity who finds walking difficult, getting to a dentist’s office is often physically painful. Added to this is the psychological pain of attempting to squeeze onto the reclining chair underneath the hanging trays and instruments. Stillwell suggests in his article that obese patients seek out dental offices equipped to handle their needs, but admits that there are very dental few practices that even consider this a problem.

Ironically, dentists were involved in developing and inserting devices in the mouth that would markedly reduce food intake to produce significant weight loss. Wiring of the teeth to prevent chewing was popular several years ago, but interest in using this approach declined rapidly in proportion to the rapid regain of weight when the jaws were freed. A modified version using a retainer-like device custom made to fit the roof of the patient’s mouth has been used with some success. The mouth can open only partially, so the patient has to take very small bites and consequently must eat very slowly. Since it takes about 15-20 minutes for the brain to realize that food has been consumed, the idea behind the retainer is that forced slow eating will produce fullness or satiety before excessive amounts of food can be consumed. Of course, it is also possible that the eater loses patience or becomes bored with the length of time it takes to complete a meal and goes on to do something else.  (“Are dentists involved in the treatment of obesity?” Karma, M.,Aw, G., and Tarakji, B., J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2016 183-188) Once the retainer is removed, weight can be regained, unless the patient is willing to continue to eat very slowly. .

Although dental devices to reduce food intake may not be the most effective way of producing weight loss, the dentist may be an effective “first responder” in offering help and advice to obese patients. Most of us are unaware of the health of our mouths since it is almost impossible to see the state of our teeth and gums except for what stares back at us in the mirror. The possibility of losing our teeth and/or going through the pain and expense of periodontal surgery for gum disease is enough to motivate or frighten us into practicing what the dentist preaches.  Unlike a physician who makes the obese patient confront his or her weight, a dentist does not deal with the size of the patient’s body. The advice and suggestions about modifying food choices to decrease sugar intake and pointing out the association of gastric reflux with enamel erosion focuses on what is above the neck.  It is hard to ignore advice which, if not followed, may cause loss of one of our basic functions— chewing—as well as negatively affecting our appearance.  The simple suggestion about brushing in association with snacking might be enough to decrease between-meal food intake. The feel of a clean mouth and teeth is sometimes enough to prevent eating from immediately starting again.

And the dentist has an immense advantage over everyone else trying to help an individual improve food intake and lose weight: the patient can’t talk back.

Does Running Holiday Errands Count as Exercise?

“I‘m exhausted!” a friend told me when I bumped into her at the supermarket. “I spent the entire weekend running around doing errands.”

“Sounds like a good way of getting exercise and errands done at the same time,” I replied, knowing what the response would be. “Well, obviously I am not running,” she retorted. “But fighting the traffic in the mall parking lot and standing in line every store is so tiring. I don’t have the energy even to get to the gym.”

Holiday preparations, with its multitude of obligations and looming deadline of December 25th, seem to cause a frenzy of multitasking and soak up scarce free time. Even before Thanksgiving leftovers are consumed, the holiday to-do list is made and the running begins.

There is a high mental and physical cost to transforming ordinary life into one characterized by holiday decorations, buying and wrapping presents, sending cards, cooking, entertaining, hosting company and/or traveling. Since these tasks are added to those normally carried out each day, such as going to work, caring for family and social activities, the result is that time normally spent preparing and eating meals and exercising is drastically decreased. Indeed, going to the gym, a yoga class, or for a run seems like an indulgence done at the cost of cramming even more holiday obligations into remaining hours of the day or week. And for some, like my friend, the fatigue that comes with probably too little sleep, too much stress, too much shopping in malls with recirculated air, and too much waiting in traffic…it all makes sitting on a couch rather than on an exercycle seem like the only option at the end of the day.

Weight gain during the holiday season is so common that right after New Year’s Day, dieting kicks in. Gaining five pounds or more from Thanksgiving to the next year is not unusual, and holiday food and drink are major contributors to increased calorie intake. But even without the eggnog, sugar cookies, mayonnaise, sour cream or melted cheese dips, and fruit cake, weight would probably be gained. Lack of time leads to food court dining, fast food drive-ins, pizza, or nibbling all day on nutritionally weak snacks. Steamed vegetables, grilled fish and large salads are for January, not for December with its endless errands.

Frequent exercise classes or solitary workout routines followed by a shower, hair drying, and make-up applying is not compatible with a mind-set of counting down to Christmas.  And for those who exercise at home rather than at a health club, the convenience of having a piece of exercise equipment nearby is often ignored, because household tasks call more loudly than 30 minutes on the treadmill.

The approach to getting through the next few weeks without compromising sleep, weight, emotional well-being and fitness?

Schedule time to keep the body and mood healthy. You are not running a toy workshop in the North Pole and setting up a sleigh (rather than Amazon) delivery system by Dec 24. Which is to say that if there is a choice between getting enough sleep, or eating a salad, lean protein and high fiber carbohydrate, or taking a brisk walk or an exercise class, or making another dash to the mall, or baking one more batch of cookies? Choose exercise you want to do. Study after study has shown the positive and immediately impact that exercise has on decreasing stress and improving mood and cognition. Over the long term? Exercise can improve general health, decrease risks from heart disease, and perhaps even neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s.  A fatigued, stiff, grumpy body dragged to the gym unwillingly will not be the same after exercising. Paradoxically, the fatigue seems to lift….probably because increased blood flow oxygenates the muscles and brain. Stiffness from sitting in a car or standing in line goes away as the heat from the exercise makes the muscles more limber. Grumpiness disappears as well. People do not scowl at themselves in a health club; they may grunt or groan from the difficulty of their particular exercise, but somehow nasty moods go away (except if there are no towels when you leave the shower).

But the best part of literally (not figuratively) running or doing any other form of physical activity is that you are doing something for yourself. You are the beneficiary. You are the one who feels better, more energetic, less irritable or worried. The time you spend in exercise belongs to you.

Giving yourself the pre-holiday gift of time to take care of yourself is not something that is done easily. Guilt and anxiety over what has to be done, and what might not get done, may interfere with your healthy intentions: “I will make that salad or take a walk after I do (fill in the blank),” you say to yourself.

Putting your need for healthy food, exercise and sleep at the top of the long to-do list is hard. And yet, what better gift can you give to your family and friends than a cheerful, not sleepy, energetic, and unstressed you?