Monthly Archives: July 2017

How Do You Know If Supplement Claims Are Hype or Truth?

At a recent university-sponsored conference on innovations in nutritional and fitness products, there was a discussion about the increasing number of fraudulent claims associated with such products in the market. When one speaker, a principal in a firm investing in start-ups specializing in fitness and nutrition, was asked how to detect ineffective or fraudulent products, he was unable to give a useful answer.

“It’s very difficult because often the claims are made up or supported by faulty research published in company-owned or for-profit journals. If it works, it is probably not a fraud,” he concluded. Someone from the audience responded with, “Yes, but placebos work also.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can barely keep up with the proliferation of fraudulent health products. Some make claims that cannot possibly be produced by the ingredients; others contain substances which are not allowed to be sold due to serious side effects, or must be prescribed only by a physician. Often states, as well as the FDA, step in to expose the deceptive nature of claims made by supplement manufacturers. In a well-publicized case a few years ago the New York State Attorney General’s office tested the contents of several popular herbal supplements and found either none of the advertised active ingredients in the product or levels too low to be effective. This past winter, the New York State Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) charged a company that claimed its product was shown in clinical trials to improve memory and cognition with making, “…False and unsubstantiated claims…” because the study cited by the company actually showed the product not working any better than a placebo. Yet the advertisements, seen frequently on television, were so compelling that the sales topped $165 million.

The most common claims seen on the labels of such dubious products are for weight loss, sexual performance (erectile dysfunction), memory loss, and mood.  Some claims are almost magical in the sweep of their promises: A New York firm claimed its dietary supplement treated senile dementia, brain atrophy, atherosclerosis, kidney dysfunction, gangrene, depression and osteoarthritis along with lung, cervical and prostate cancer. Alas, for anyone now wanting to buy a product that will cure all that is wrong with you, it is no longer available. U.S Marshals seized it after a request by the FDA in 2012.

Personal testimonials are often so compelling that they sell a product. Who hasn’t looked at the before and after pictures of someone who used a weight-loss product and marveled at the change? Statements like, “I am no longer hungry, depressed, diabetic, or bald!“ beckon to us from the internet, tabloid magazines, newspaper advertisements and television spots. These people must be real, one thinks…and if he grows hair, maybe I will also.

Health products claiming a quick fix such as, “Cover your bald spot by next Tuesday,” or, “Lose your double chin by this afternoon!” are also hard to resist, but should be regarded with as much suspicion as someone trying to sell you a bridge. Glue is a quick fix; health products rarely are. The FDA tells us to beware of health products attempting to gain a marketing edge by claiming that they are all natural. By the way, snake venom is also natural.

One easy way to detect whether a claim is legitimate or not is whether the term, “Miracle” is used on the label. Look at it this way, if the words “miracle cure” are attached to the ad, consider it a miracle that anyone is foolish enough to buy the product.

But of course there are many over-the-counter (non-prescription) supplements that work, are safe, contain the dose of active ingredients printed on the label, and don’t hide drugs deemed illegal by the FDA. If a combination of vitamin D and calcium promises bone health in the amounts recommended by physicians, such a supplement will help to restore bone cell growth and decrease bone fragility. Supplemental vitamins, minerals and protein will help restore depleted levels of these nutrients due to prolonged illness, chemotherapy, or gastrointestinal impairment. Again, it is imperative to check with a healthcare giver about quantities; more is not always better.

But what if you are not sure whether the claims are to be believed. What should you do?

Ask your health care provider. Take a picture of the ingredient label on a product you are thinking of buying, and ask whether any of the ingredients actually do what they are supposed to. Use the internet to look up the ingredients to see what studies support the claims of the product. Write to the FDA.

Example: A product relieving anxiety and stress claims that the ingredients, “…promote serotonin synthesis.” But the main ingredients are chamomile and valerian, herbal products that may cause drowsiness; these do not promote serotonin. A physician will know that the product is incapable of increasing serotonin synthesis.

Here’s another: A product containing saffron extract as its main ingredient claims, ”…Reduces cravings, boosts metabolism, blocks appetite, lowers blood pressure and increases energy.” Investigating whether there are any studies linking saffron extract to all these wondrous health effects may seem like a nuisance, but will save money and possibly, ill side effects.

Signing up for the FDA Consumer Updates page is essential for anyone routinely buying supplements because of their weekly descriptions of products containing hidden drugs, fillers, or bits and pieces of insects or twigs. Recently, the agency has warned consumers about more than 100 products containing illegal drugs; most of these products are sold for sexual enhancement, weight loss and bodybuilding.

Avoiding supplements that may not work, may not contain the ingredients listed, or contain ingredients that are harmful cannot be ensured. But a little homework and help from the FDA make the odds better that what you buy is safe and effective.

Meals in a Box: The Answer to Eating Your Vegetables?

More than a dozen companies will, for a price, send you the ingredients for a complete, relatively interesting dinner, or smoothie snacks even, if you choose that option. All you have to do is open the many large and small packages, read the instructions and in 30 minutes or so, eat your own freshly prepared entrée. The concept is practical for the many who do not have the time or energy after work to figure out what to prepare for dinner and then to make sure the ingredients are in the kitchen. Meal-in-the-box choices tend to be more imaginative than grilled chicken breast and frozen veggies because professional chefs devise the menus and make available the entire ingredient list from the main course protein to a tiniest pinch of some herb or spice that the customer probably never heard of and/or doesn’t have. No looking up recipes in a cookbook or on the Internet is needed, nor guess work about the cooking methods.  Detailed instructions are given, perishable foods are kept cold with icepacks, and preparation time is thirty minutes. The end product may not get you, the customer, a spot on the Food Network program “Chopped” in which professional chefs are given ingredients in a box and compete to make an original perfectly cooked entrée and sides in thirty minutes…But unlike the competitors who turn their food over to the judges? The customers of meals in a box get to eat their finished product.

However, making the meals from the ingredients in the box will cost about twice as much as making it from ingredients assembled yourself. According to Consumer Reports, one company’s blackened tilapia dish costs almost $12.00 per person, compared to a little more than $5.00 when put together oneself. A tofu and Chinese broccoli dish from another company costs over $11.00. These ingredients are very inexpensive and will cost approximately $3.50 if you buy the ingredients from the supermarket, and even less from a Chinese grocery store.  The prices for some of these dishes are less than in a restaurant (although perhaps not for the Chinese entrée) but add up quickly as the cost is per person. Moreover, unless the customers are small eaters, no leftovers for the next day’s lunch will remain. But it is also unlikely that there will be much wasted, thrown away, uneaten food. Nor will the refrigerator fill up with plastic containers full of tidbits from previous meals.

It is no surprise, given our current fixation of dietary restrictions that gluten-free, carbohydrate-free dairy-free, vegetarian, vegan, organic (of course) calorie-restricted meals are available depending on which company is providing the foods.

But are they healthy? Will eating a meal from a box provide you with some of the vegetable, fruit, grain, protein, and dairy servings you ought to be getting? It depends. Certainly compared to many takeout and restaurant meals that tend to be free of food groups containing nutrients your body needs, the boxed to-be-prepared meals often contain substantial amounts of vegetables, and sometimes whole grains. If you tend to ignore the vegetables in your refrigerator bin until they turn into a slimy green mass, then ordering meals with a substantial amount of vegetables will ensure that you are eating this essential food group.

Yet there is a possible nutritional caveat to some of the meals. The salt content may be higher than recommended, especially if some of the seasonings contain sodium, like garlic or onion powder, or if salt if added several times during preparation. Consumer Reports analyzed sodium content and found many dishes containing 30% more than recommended, and some dishes containing as much as 1 gram of salt per serving.

Are boxed meal ingredients a trend, or the beginning of a permanent shift in the way people prepare meals? Probably the latter because they appeal not only to those who don’t (and won’t) prepare meals from scratch, but also to a generation who have been preparing meals from scratch for decades. For those who have been afraid to boil water, learning how to cook from the boxes might eventually give them confidence to cook on their own. It is sort of comparable to shifting from paint-by-numbers to covering a blank canvas with one’s own creation. For those who are tired of figuring out what to cook for dinner and despair at the high prices and noise levels of most restaurants, boxed meals are an easy way of eating interesting food less expensively (and in a setting that doesn’t require either waiting or tipping.)

Many companies are selling meals for people on all sorts of diets and presumably are competing with portion-controlled, factory-prepared meals sold by some national weight-loss companies.  Since the meals in a box are portion and ingredient controlled, the dieter does not have to be concerned about going over a calorie limit. There is no guessing about whether the weight of the entrée or the teaspoons of olive oil will fit the calorie requirements for a particular meal. On the other hand, by requiring the dieter to get involved in food preparation, she may lose her fear of not being able to prepare a meal on her own that allows her to continue to lose weight and/or keep it off.

This trend is still relatively new, but its rapid growth indicates that it meets the lifestyles demands of large numbers of people. However, since spending a little time in meal preparation is still necessary, we should not be surprised if, a few years from now, some of the boxes will contain a robot that will do the cooking.

According to a 2016 Consumer Reports analyses, home delivery of meal ingredients is about a $400 million dollars a year industry. Although the major portion of the sales are focused along the coasts and in major urban areas, sales are projected to increase throughout the country. They may not be replacing all home delivered pizza and Chinese food, but certainly offer healthier and more varied options.

How Do You Know Whether Supplement Claims are Hype or True?

At a recent university-sponsored conference on innovations in nutritional and fitness products, there was a discussion about the increasing number of fraudulent claims associated with such products in the market. When one speaker, a principal in a firm investing in start-ups specializing in fitness and nutrition, was asked how to detect ineffective or fraudulent products, he was unable to give a useful answer.

“It’s very difficult because often the claims are made up or supported by faulty research published in company-owned or for-profit journals. If it works, it is probably not a fraud,” he concluded. Someone from the audience responded with, “Yes, but placebos work also.”

The Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) can barely keep up with the proliferation of fraudulent health products. Some make claims that cannot possibly be produced by the ingredients; others contain substances which are not allowed to be sold due to serious side effects, or must be prescribed only by a physician. Oftentimes states, as well as the FDA, step in to expose the deceptive nature of claims made by supplement manufacturers. In a well-publicized case a few years ago the New York State Attorney General’s office tested the contents of several popular herbal supplements and found either none of the advertised active ingredients in the product or levels too low to be effective. This past winter, the New York State Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) charged a company that claimed its product was shown in clinical trials to improve memory and cognition with making, “false and unsubstantiated claims” because the study cited by the company actually showed the product not working any better than a placebo. Yet the advertisements, seen frequently on television, were so compelling that the sales topped $165 million.

The most common claims seen on the labels of such dubious products are for weight loss, sexual performance (erectile dysfunction), memory loss, and mood.  Some claims are almost magical in the sweep of their promises: A New York firm claimed its dietary supplement treated senile dementia, brain atrophy, atherosclerosis, kidney dysfunction, gangrene, depression and osteoarthritis along with lung, cervical and prostate cancer. Alas, for anyone now wanting to buy a product that will cure all that is wrong with you, it is no longer available. U.S Marshalls seized it after a request by the FDA in 2012.

Personal testimonials are often so compelling that they sell a product. Who hasn’t looked at the before and after pictures of someone who used a weight-loss product and marveled at the change? Statements like, “I am no longer hungry, depressed, diabetic, or bald!“ beckon to us from the Internet, tabloid magazines, newspaper advertisements and television spots. These people must be real, one thinks…and if he grows hair, maybe I will also.

Health products claiming a quick fix such as, “Cover your bald spot by next Tuesday!” or, “Lose your double chin by this afternoon!” are also hard to resist, but should be regarded with as much suspicion as someone trying to sell you a bridge. Glue is a quick fix; health products rarely are. The FDA tells us to beware of health products attempting to gain a marketing edge by claiming that they are all natural. By the way, snake venom is also natural.

One easy way to detect whether a claim is legitimate or not is whether the term, “Miracle” is used on the label. Look at it this way, if the words “miracle cure” are attached to the ad, consider it a miracle that anyone is foolish enough to buy the product.

But of course there are many over-the-counter (non-prescription) supplements that work, are safe, contain the dose of active ingredients printed on the label, and don’t hide drugs deemed illegal by the FDA. If a combination of vitamin D and calcium promises bone health in the amounts recommended by physicians, such a supplement will help to restore bone cell growth and decrease bone fragility.  Supplemental vitamins, minerals and protein will help restore depleted levels of these nutrients due to prolonged illness, chemotherapy, or gastrointestinal impairment. Again, it is imperative to check with a healthcare giver about quantities; more is not always better.

But what if you are not sure whether the claims are to be believed. What should you do?

Ask your health care provider. Take a picture of the ingredient label on a product you are thinking of buying, and ask whether any of the ingredients actually do what they are supposed to. Use the Internet to look up the ingredients to see what studies support the claims of the product. Write to the FDA.

Example:  A product relieving anxiety and stress claims that the ingredients, “…promote serotonin synthesis.” But the main ingredients are chamomile and valerian, herbal products that may cause drowsiness; these do not promote serotonin. A physician will know that the product is incapable of increasing serotonin synthesis.

Here’s another: A product containing saffron extract as its main ingredient claims, ”…Reduces cravings, boosts metabolism, blocks appetite, lowers blood pressure and increases energy.”  Investigating whether there are any studies linking saffron extract to all these wondrous health effects may seem like a nuisance, but will save money and possibly, ill side effects.

Signing up for the FDA Consumer Updates page is essential for anyone routinely buying supplements because of their weekly descriptions of products containing hidden drugs, fillers, or bits and pieces of insects or twigs. Recently, the agency has warned consumers about more than 100 products containing illegal drugs; most of these products are sold for sexual enhancement, weight loss and bodybuilding.

Avoiding supplements that may not work, may not contain the ingredients listed, or contain ingredients that are harmful cannot be ensured. But a little homework and help from the FDA make the odds better that what you buy is safe and effective.

Social Loneliness May Make the Depressed Even More So

Loneliness is a state that may affect everyone at some point in his or her life. It is not necessary to go on a trek across the continent, or row alone across the Atlantic to feel lonely. Sitting by oneself in a crowded movie theater or restaurant, or walking on your own on a lovely spring afternoon in a park filled with couples, families and friends can feel just as isolating.

Sometimes social isolation is a matter of choice or temporary circumstance. A relative of mine, who had to rewrite a 500-page thesis in order to turn it into a book, willingly isolated herself for months in order to accomplish this task. A parent unable to leave the house because of weather and sick children may not speak to anyone over the age of six for a few days, but knows that eventually this will change. A computer coder may shun company for days in order to finish a time dependent task; so too may anyone involved in a creative act.

Others are alone too much, but not by choice or a temporary situation. It is a fact of their lives. The groups one thinks about first are the elderly, and those we call “shut-ins.” They weren’t always so alone but sickness, frailty, lack of easy transportation, death of spouses, friends, and even adult children…potentially their declining eye sight and hearing, limited financial resources, and fear of crime may result in an extremely limited interaction with the social world.

“My friends are all dead,” my husband’s uncle used to tell us as he reached the late nineties. “All the guys I would play cards with and have a meal with, they are all gone.”

Residence in an assisted-living facility may surround an elderly individual with people, but social interactions and friendships do not necessarily follow. A sad scene familiar to those of us who have visited relatives in facilities is a row of residents, lined up in wheelchairs, who are not talking to each other, and indeed seem to be totally isolated despite the other people around.

But one does not have to live into old age to feel this social loneliness. People of all ages who are suffering from mental illness can experience it at any age. In a recent report put out by an Australian mental health support organization, about 66% of people with mental illness report feeling socially isolated compared with about 10% of the general population. The reasons for this vary from lack of money and/or transportation, misunderstanding among others as to the nature of the illness, and even fear of others prevent forming a close relationship. Those with mental illness often claim that they are stigmatized, or at the very least, treated differently.

“Maybe people believe we are going to behave in unpredictable, embarrassing, or violent ways,” said a friend who has suffered from bipolar disease for years. “There is reluctance for a casual interaction to go much further.”nability to become involved in activities that may decrease loneliness is sometimes generated by mental illness itself. Social phobia, fears about public spaces (although these days, this may just be commonsense), inability to leave the house, hold a job or even communicate without difficulty; all reduce the possibility of interacting with others. A weight-loss client of mine was very specific about the days she could come to my office, as they were dependent on her cycles of mania and depression. Another client who was depressed would stay up very late at night and sleep most of the day, thereby avoiding the necessity to interact with anyone.

Regardless of the causes of social isolation and the groups who are affected by it, being alone is not good for one’s mental and physical health. Being alone most of the time is associated with increased weight, poorer diet, decreased exercise, alcohol abuse, greater risk of sickness, and even a shorter life span. Cognitive functions decline, possibly as a result of few verbal interactions. Added to this is the emotional pain of being lonely. People whose circumstances prevent them from interacting with others for short periods of time report feeling depressed and out of touch with what is going on around them. Imagine the effect if social isolation is a way of life.

Fortunately, there are social spaces where people with mental illness can go and feel comfortable and accepted, as well as receive advice, support, and/or information about relevant services, are available in many communities. Volunteers in organizations like the National Alliance usually run these drop-in centers or peer support groups on mental illness. They provide a critical service, especially for those patients and their families who are seeking to interact with others experiencing the same problems.

Going to meetings is one way of decreasing time spent alone, and it is possible that a network of acquaintances with whom to spend time can develop from this. Several years ago, I led a weight-loss group made up of mentally ill individuals who had gained weight on their psychotropic medications. After a few meetings, the participants organized Sunday walks or, if the weather was bad, a meal and a movie.

Unfortunately, making available accessible and socially safe places for people with mental illness to meet is dependent on volunteer resources, and these may be limited to family and friends of the mentally ill. The sad fact is that many potential volunteers would probably prefer giving their time (and maybe money) to an animal adoption center than spend time socializing with mentally ill individuals.  An acquaintance in a mid-size southern city found that despite city resources to fund a drop-in center associated with a neighborhood health clinic, there were no volunteers available to staff the facility.

According to the previously mentioned SANE report, almost all people with mental illness consider social relationships important in helping them manage their symptoms and improve the quality of their life. They said that simply having someone to talk to about how they feel is critical to their feeling better. It doesn’t take many people to diminish the loneliness of an individual.

Just one will do.

We all should try to be that one.