Monthly Archives: November 2017

If We Had More Time to Eat, Would We Eat More?

The national eating day, Thanksgiving, is unusual in several respects. People who rarely cook spend hours in the kitchen transforming a rather ungainly raw bird into something beautifully edible and making artistic creations out of mashed sweet potatoes with marshmallows.  Stale bread that otherwise might be fed to the birds is turned into a complex dish that may or may not cook inside the turkey.  The table is formally set, and many courses with numerous dishes are served.  And the meal will take time.

Unless they have another Thanksgiving meal to go to, or feel compelled to Christmas bargain shop, guests are happy to dine leisurely. The meal may take considerably more than an hour, and rushing through is restricted to getting seconds on desserts before they are gone.  In this respect, Thanksgiving and other major holiday dining differs significantly from the way many of us eat the rest of the year.

That we eat more on Thanksgiving than on other days is not disputable.  Serving excessive amounts of food is appropriate, and we are expected to eat until we feel stuffed, and then eat some more. But would we eat so much if there were less time to do so?  Would we eat less if, like so many other days of the year, late afternoon/early evening activities and obligations shorten supper to a grab-and-chew type meal, rather than a sit-down dinner? Would we change the amount of food we eat if we actually sat and ate breakfast and lunch, rather than standing in line for take-out and then quickly consuming it before going back to work? Is eating quickly a prescription for too much, or too little food intake?

A few weeks ago I was having lunch with a relative who works for a large law firm. She kept looking at her watch as we stood in line for our salads at a food court. “They don’t like us to take more than 30 minutes for lunch,” she told me. “I hope I have time to eat.”

She is not alone. For many of us, eating is something we fit into our busy schedules often while we are doing something else, e.g. sending messages on our cell phone, working at our desks, or driving.

Hypothetically, if we have very little time to eat, we should be eating very little. A muffin or bagel for breakfast and two slices of pizza or a tuna wrap for lunch feels like fewer calories than a traditional breakfast of eggs and toast… or a lunch of baked chicken, potato, vegetables, roll and dessert. However, often when we choose foods that can be eaten quickly, we don’t notice that they can be calorically dense. A muffin or bagel with cream cheese may contain 600 calories, and a tuna salad sub with mayonnaise and cheese delivers as many calories as the hot lunch.

When we do not have time to eat, we may do it so quickly that we dump more food than necessary in our stomachs, like someone competing in an “All the hot dogs you can eat!” contest.  Sometimes when we gulp our food we don’t even notice how much we are eating. This is also true if we are multi-tasking while putting food in our mouths.

Sitting for a long time at a meal has its own perils. We may find it impossible to resist eating more than we intended to because we have the time and the food, especially the desserts, are there to tempt us. We are no longer hungry, yet the cookies or nuts or chocolate or pies are still on the table and it is hard, unless we are sitting on our hands, not to reach for them. A friend who often hosts long, leisurely meals told me that guests who resist eating dessert when she first serves it will often reach for the cake or cookies later on if they are all still sitting and chatting. Of course, meals that are interrupted by speeches between courses are a perfect prescription for overeating. The guest is a hostage to someone’s boring talk and eating seems to be the only way to endure it.

On the other hand, if we have the time to have an “appetizer” of carbohydrate, e.g., a roll, rice cakes, or crackers about 20 minutes before we start our meal, we may find ourselves eating less.  The carbohydrate potentiates the production of the brain chemical serotonin, and that in turn will make us feel somewhat full before the meal begins. This helps control how much we eat subsequently (a critical aid for dieters), and causes us to stop eating before we clean our plates.  But when time is limited, eating quickly and without the benefit of the satiating effects of serotonin, we could be eating more than we should.

Either too much or too little time can disrupt moderate and reasonable food intake. But certainly we should take the time to enjoy Thanksgiving for its own sake regardless of how much, or how long it takes to eat.

Who Cares for the Caregivers?

Her husband’s Parkinson disease had progressed significantly since we’d last seen each other and her stress progressed along with it. The kitchen counter was covered with pill containers and dosing schedules; the wheelchair was sitting by the ramp to the car and her husband waiting patiently for his aide to help him get dressed.

My friend, let’s call her Mandy, barely said hello before launching into a description of the difficulty she had getting her husband ready for bed the previous night. Apparently, he sat in the wrong chair in the living room while watching a football game. The chair did not have the jack that would propel him to his feet. It took two hours to get him upright and ready for bed in a tiny room near the kitchen. He could no longer climb stairs to their bedroom. She was exhausted and near tears.

Her situation is repeated in homes throughout the country where one spouse or child or elderly parent is losing physical, and often cognitive, strength due to neurological diseases that get worse over time. My friend is one of the fortunate ones. She is able to afford the service of professional aides and a physical therapist because of insurance purchased many years earlier when they were both healthy. Someone much stronger than she is can carry out the actual “heavy lifting.” That person is experienced in how to move a body that cannot move itself without great difficulty. But like so many others, she is dependent on the aide showing up, and she has to scramble to find people to fill in on weekends and holidays.

The Family Caregiver Alliance, a non-profit organization that provides support for people like my friend, a so-called informal caregiver, states that the numbers of unpaid caregivers in the U.S. in 2015 is about 43.5 million. Their caregiving, if paid for, would cost more than 470 billion dollars a year. More than 75 percent of the caregivers are women, and more than two-thirds of those receiving care are also women. It is estimated that 20 hours or more each week is devoted to the needs of the spouse, child, or parent so the informal caregiving is akin to an unpaid part-time job, with few entire days off.

Anyone who has filled this position knows that the tasks range far beyond giving out medicine at the right time. Often the number of tasks increase to the point where the patient needs help in just about every activity of daily living, from dressing and undressing to personal hygiene and being fed, and the responsibility of running the household, paying bills, and making medical appointments. The must-do list simply grows longer as the impairment from the disease increases.

The toll this takes on those who give the care is well-characterized and predictable. Just about every aspect of life is affected: sleep, physical and psychological well-being, work, socializing, pursuing personal interests, and hobbies. They all give way to the needs of the patient. Simply getting out of the house to do more than a quick trip to the supermarket or dentist is a rarity for many.

Mandy lives in a residential neighborhood only a few blocks from a library, stores, restaurants, and a supermarket so she sees other people when she takes her husband for an outing in his wheelchair. And she manages to get to a yoga class once a week when her husband is with his aide. But she has rarely has time to work on a collection of essays she has been writing, and her former volunteering activities have been abandoned. But she is fortunate; at least she is able to leave the house a few times a week.

Some diseases are easier to deal with than others, but no one gets to choose. When the caregiver is able to still share an emotional and cognitive life with his or her spouse or partner, the caregiving is bearable. But if the patient is unable to communicate and respond to the caregiver, it makes the caregiving even more difficult. Despite that it is the disease, and not the individual, who is responsible for the changed behavior; it may be extremely hard for the caregiver to hold onto that fact when dealing with unexpected anger, depression, apathy and sometimes non-recognition. In a study of the emotional burden carried by the caregiver, Croog, Burleson, and their team reported that anger and resentment was a common complaint along with lack of personal time and social isolation. There are support groups for the ‘”informal” caregivers, and they are geared toward helping with the specific problems presented by a disease, for example, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or ALS.

Over a cup of coffee, Mandy told that that the one thing she did not expect, as her husband’s symptoms worsened, was being alone so much of the time. “We have many friends; we both lived in this community for decades. But very few come to visit anymore, and we rarely are invited to other people’s homes because of lack of wheelchair access. And some people just avoid us because somehow they don’t know how to act around someone with a debilitating illness.”

Fortunately, my friend is strong and resilient, an excellent manager and a person who is able to meet the unending obligations she encounters. But she, like so many others in her situation, would like to have someone who understands and can share with her the difficult emotions and conflicting feelings she is experiencing in fulfilling the “in sickness” part of her wedding vows.

She too would like some care.

References

Spouse caregivers of Alzheimer patients: problem responses to caregiver burden. Croog SH, Burleson JA, Sudilovsky A, Baume RM. Aging Ment Health. 2006 Mar;10(2):87-100.