Monthly Archives: July 2018

The Most Overlooked Benefit of Exercise: The Ability to Get from Point A to Point B

A friend who just returned from Seattle was recounting the unexpected steepness of the city streets. ”Nothing is flat,” she told me. “You are either going up or down.” She was not young and had been worried about spending time exploring the city with a relative at least 10 years her junior. The younger woman was athletic and her favorite leisure activity was going on very long walks.“One day we walked up hills so steep I wondered how cars could drive up them! She took me up flight after flight of outdoor steps to get into certain neighborhoods. But I kept up with her and I don’t think I was puffing anymore than she was…“

My friend ascribed her stamina to her favorite gym activities: either walking on an elevated treadmill that mimicked walking uphill, or the elliptical climber which required a motion similar to climbing a shallow set of steps.

“I exercise because it is a habit,” she said as we discussed her unexpected physical prowess. “If I skip more than a day or two, I don’t feel right and have trouble sleeping. And of course it is good for my bones, especially since my mother suffered from osteoporosis and fractured her hip. But it never occurred to me that it would improve my, I guess I would call it, functionality.”

“You mean your ability to move better, longer, more efficiently and with less fatigue?” I asked.

“Yes, all of the above,” she laughed, “almost like a real athlete.”

Her experience of finding herself able to handle the demands on her body of trudging up hills because she exercised regularly should not have been a surprise. This, after all, is the point of training for competitive athletes or people setting off to climb mountains in the Himalayas or bike ride across the continental U.S. But those of us who are not planning on competing in athletic events and prefer to watch mountain climbing on a National Geographic special forget the most basic benefit of exercise: It prepares our body to engage in physical activity that may at times become demanding and strenuous.

The converse is painfully obvious. Someone who is unfit because of a voluntary disregard for any type of regular physical activity will have trouble climbing the steps out of a subway station or walking down a seemingly endless airport terminal corridor on the way to a gate or exit. Breathing becomes labored, muscles begin to ache and there may even be the feeling that unless help in the form of an escalator or one of the airport moving people carriers comes along, the goal of getting out of the subway or to the departure gate will not be achievable.

Of course, there are many who would, but cannot, exercise because of physical limitations. For example, a painfully bad back or severe asthma are obstacles to physical activity that may be difficult to overcome. And there are many whose lifestyle severely limits time to go on a long walk, work out at a gym or have time on a day off to engage in recreational sports. Convincing those who could, but don’t exercise, usually relies on listing the benefits to one’s weight, skeletal infrastructure, digestive system, sleep, cognition, mood, vulnerability to diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure, and life span. For example, there are some studies claiming that weight loss can be achieved through exercise alone without dieting, and that exercise is important in decreasing stress and depression.

But why do we ignore the obvious? If we rely only on vehicular transportation, we will diminish our stamina, endurance, the ability to oxygenate muscle cells sufficiently for prolonged contractions, and our muscle mass.

In short, we will find it more and more difficult to go from point A to point B.

It is possible to go through adult life with minimal need to engage in physical activity to arrive at a destination. Cars that sit in a garage next to the kitchen, or in a parking space a few steps from the elevator in the office building, reduce the need to walk. Malls that allow parking in front of a store or restaurant, or valet services that bring the car back to where you are standing on a sidewalk, also eliminate the need to move very much. One can even find scooters in supermarkets so walking can be avoided, and ordering groceries on line eliminates the need to even go to the market.

However, there are consequences to a lifetime of little voluntary physical activity beyond the obvious ones of physical well-being. It means not being able to explore a new city or museum or zoo on foot. It means not being able to walk through the woods, around a lake, or a botanical garden. It means a casual stroll with a child or friend or spouse is not pleasurable because fatigue and muscle pain quickly limit distance and enjoyment.

My friend concluded her description of her tramp through the city with an ecstatic description of the flagship Starbucks restaurant that sits on top of a steep hill. The restaurant, part museum, part coffee grinding factory and mostly a place where the city folk gather to drink coffee and eat incredible pastries from Italy was the treat her relative had planned for her. “She told me parking is impossible around that neighborhood, and she hoped I was going to be able to get there on foot. My days of exercising really paid off.”

Is It Safe to Eat Food This Summer? Or Ever?

If you want to feel paranoid about eating in restaurants, or buying packaged fruits and vegetables that may be also be pre-cut, and cooking chicken and eggs, then don’t look up current food-borne illnesses on the Internet. I have a relative who gets alerts from the CDC about the latest source of food poisoning, and immediately passes the information on to me before I read about it in the newspapers. She told me to avoid Del Monte packages of cut-up vegetables as they contain a microscopic parasite, and also to dodge Cyclosporai via pre-cut melon because of a multi-state salmonella outbreak, and a few months ago, she alerted me not to buy Romaine lettuce in the supermarket or eat salads containing this leafy vegetable at restaurants because it was contaminated with E.coli. Thankfully, it is now again safe to have salads with this lettuce.

My food contamination alerts decreased temporarily when she went on vacation, so I decided to find out for myself what other aggressive pathogens might be lurking in my food supply. A quick scan of websites devoted to reports of food-borne illnesses uncovered a report about Kellogg’s breakfast cereal Sugar Smacks linked to a Salmonella outbreak across 31 states, Canadian restaurant workers in danger of Salmonella if they handle raw or frozen uncooked chicken, and one horrifying story in the British press about a man who nearly died after he ate a chicken liver parfait (we would call it a mousse) at a dinner at which he got an award from his employer. His situation sounds like something out of an Agatha Christie novel: disgruntled employee kills co-worker who received an award.  But actually many of the 500 people who attended the event got sick as well. However, this individual spent seven weeks in intensive care because he was unable to move his arms and legs and could neither talk nor blink. His eyes remained opened and he could not sleep. This ghastly set of symptoms was due to the Campylobacter bacteria. According to the report, the chicken liver “parfait” should have been heated to a much higher temperature than it was in order to kill off the bacteria lurking within.

How was the awardee, or any of the others who attended the catered dinner, supposed to know this?

And this is the problem. It is all very well to read about the outbreaks and then check the refrigerator to see whether the contaminated item is there. But obviously we know about the problem only after people become ill. In the back of our minds we may find ourselves thinking, maybe I will be the one getting sick from the next contaminated food outbreak. When the Romaine lettuce recall occurred a few months ago, and people shared information about this with their family and friends, I saw more than a few horrified expressions that seemed to say, “Didn’t I just have a salad at a restaurant or homemade with Romaine lettuce?”

The same thing is true of food poisoning from restaurants. There is a website, “I was poisoned.com”, on which victims of contaminated restaurant food write about the unpleasant aftermath of the meals they ate at a particular restaurant. I suspect that fewer people check that website before going out to eat than looking up the menu options in a restaurant they are considering visiting. But maybe one should start on the website first.

It is disheartening to realize that all of us are in jeopardy. Even if you never eat in a restaurant, unless you grow your own fruits and vegetables, raise chickens for eggs and baked chicken breasts, and also make your own bread from your hand-milled flour (flour from certain mills was contaminated last year), you could be next.

Of course, we can and should use precaution in our own food preparation: cooking foods at a high enough temperature to kill the pathogens, refrigerate foods as quickly as possible, keep counters and sponges clean, wash our hands after handling raw eggs and poultry, and prevent what is called cross-contamination. This means not wiping the counter with the sponge you used to mop up raw chicken juice (ugh) or making a salad with hands not washed after touching same chicken.  Perhaps decreasing the number of meals we eat away from home might also help. Preparing your own container of cut-up fruit or chicken salad or smoothie rather than buying these items eliminates the uncertainty of where the food comes from and the whether it was prepared under strict sanitary conditions. Avoid eating foods at catered buffets that look as if they could shelter bacteria. A mousse of chicken liver , assuming one likes chicken liver, should be consumed with caution if only because unless it is kept cold, one doesn’t know whether it is a culture medium for bacteria.

But how does one protect oneself against an outbreak of food-borne illness if the food is something as unprocessed as lettuce or cantaloupe? Or how is the consumer to know that Kellogg had another company manufacture the cereal that was contaminated?

A start would be to stop being complacent about food safety. Rather, perhaps a bit of paranoia is worth having when reading a restaurant menu, checking out the cleanliness of a restaurant rest- room  (where unwashed restaurant workers’ hands may cause hepatitis A outbreaks) and taking a peak at the “I was poisoned” website.

Just don’t look at it after you eat.