Does Halloween Begin the Trifecta of Weight Gain?

Soon after Labor Day, almost before the bathing suits of summer have been put away, bags of miniature Halloween candy begIn to appear on supermarket and drugstore shelves. Those tiny candy bars will be devoured to celebrate a holiday that has nothing to do with candy, and the hundreds of calories they contain will initiate the fall season of weight gain. Soon the black and orange wrapped candy will be replaced by chocolate turkeys for the national binge day, Thanksgiving, and then towers of green and red wrapped candies, cookies, and cakes will be displayed for the December holidays.

It is understandable how Thanksgiving and Christmas became holidays characterized, in part, by excessive consumption of special foods that are usually replete with cream, butter, sugar, egg yolks and chocolate. In the old days, these holidays represented the few times a year when expensive, scarce food stuffs like sugar, chocolate, costly cuts of meat, and exotic fruits like oranges, and special alcoholic drinks were served in liberal portions.  Religious and national events like Christmas, the 4th of July, or the yearly fair have always been celebrated with copious amounts of food.  Often guests contributed their own special recipes to a gathering, and it was not unusual to have several main dishes, many sides and a large number of desserts. No one worried about how many calories were eaten because food intake was frugal and, for some, even scarce for the rest of the year.  But now, of course, the caloric excesses that begin with devouring miniature candy bars and end with New Year’s Eve buffets may not be compensated with frugal eating the rest of the time.

But how is that Halloween, a holiday which originated as a religious event, has metamorphosed into the opportunity to eat excessive amount of sugars, fat, artificial flavorings and color while wearing a costume? And how is it that the attempt by some food companies to reduce sugar content in many of their products is being offset by large confectionery companies marketing Halloween candy? And how, as our nation becomes fatter every year, are we going to continue to allow this?

Collecting, counting, and collating the candy gathered during an evening of trick or treating is a relatively new phenomenon. To be sure, hordes of face-painted or masked kids have been roaming the streets on Halloween, ringing doorbells and asking for handouts for many decades. Mid-20th century, the handouts were rarely commercially packaged miniaturized candy bars. Treats like cookies, popcorn balls, Rice Krispy squares, brownies and fudge were often homemade. Candy corn, invented in l880, Hersey’s Kisses in l907 and M+M’s in l941, along with a smattering of regular size candy bars, were available as treats, but competed with homemade chocolate chip cookies. Then we became scared of anything that was not made and sealed in a factory. The appearance of razor blades in apples and the possibility of toxic ingredients in homemade baked goods frightened us into allowing our children and ourselves to accept only commercially produced, sealed snacks like miniature candy bars and tiny bags of candy corn. And the confectionery companies responded. Any candy that could be shrunk, wrapped in Halloween colors, put in a large bag and sold in bulk, was.

Of course, the calories per candy item were also shrunk because the candies were one big bite.  Alas (and the candy makers know this), we think, “They are so small, how could they be fattening?” and pop three or four tiny Snickers or Butterfinger bars into our mouths.  The little candies can be stashed in drawers, brief cases, knapsacks, glove compartments, pocketbooks and pockets and constitute an almost endless supply of sugary, high-fat treats—and calories. And so the season of fattening ourselves up begins.

The over-consumption of sugary treats falls at the time of year when we may be feeling stressed because of after-summer vacation workload for adults and for kids, homework.  Are we craving candy because as darkness increases, our good moods decrease? Would chewing through a mound of candy corn be as appealing in the middle of July as it is at the end of October?  We know that the good mood brain chemical, serotonin, is made when any carbohydrate (sugar, starch) other than fruit is eaten. Is candy more appealing than a bowl of oatmeal that brings about the same feelings of calm and comfort?

It is hard to find any good reason for children or adults to consume mounds of candy. In an ideal world, the plastic bags of miniature candy bars would be replaced by bags of vacuum-packed apple slices, or oranges or baby carrots. Treats might also include pretzels, popcorn, miniature protein or high fiber, high-energy bars or breakfast bars. These have the virtue of being low or fat-free, have some nutritional value, and, after the holiday, can be put in a lunch box for a daily snack.

But how are we going to stop the avalanche of fall candy consumption? It means pushing back against the confectionery companies so that like the large soda manufacturers who have reduced sugar in their drinks, they see a profit in offering healthier Halloween treats. It means working within neighborhoods and schools to convince everyone to resist dumping handfuls of candy bars into plastic pumpkins held by seven year-old trick-or-treaters. Perhaps people can be convinced to donate some of the money that would have been spent on candy to a local food bank and contribute the rest to the local school or neighborhood center for a Halloween party.  Halloween is a holiday made for fun, and surely we can figure out how to have fun without the candy calories hanging on our hips the next day.

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