Does Running Holiday Errands Count as Exercise?

“I‘m exhausted!” a friend told me when I bumped into her at the supermarket. “I spent the entire weekend running around doing errands.”

“Sounds like a good way of getting exercise and errands done at the same time,” I replied, knowing what the response would be. “Well, obviously I am not running,” she retorted. “But fighting the traffic in the mall parking lot and standing in line every store is so tiring. I don’t have the energy even to get to the gym.”

Holiday preparations, with its multitude of obligations and looming deadline of December 25th, seem to cause a frenzy of multitasking and soak up scarce free time. Even before Thanksgiving leftovers are consumed, the holiday to-do list is made and the running begins.

There is a high mental and physical cost to transforming ordinary life into one characterized by holiday decorations, buying and wrapping presents, sending cards, cooking, entertaining, hosting company and/or traveling. Since these tasks are added to those normally carried out each day, such as going to work, caring for family and social activities, the result is that time normally spent preparing and eating meals and exercising is drastically decreased. Indeed, going to the gym, a yoga class, or for a run seems like an indulgence done at the cost of cramming even more holiday obligations into remaining hours of the day or week. And for some, like my friend, the fatigue that comes with probably too little sleep, too much stress, too much shopping in malls with recirculated air, and too much waiting in traffic…it all makes sitting on a couch rather than on an exercycle seem like the only option at the end of the day.

Weight gain during the holiday season is so common that right after New Year’s Day, dieting kicks in. Gaining five pounds or more from Thanksgiving to the next year is not unusual, and holiday food and drink are major contributors to increased calorie intake. But even without the eggnog, sugar cookies, mayonnaise, sour cream or melted cheese dips, and fruit cake, weight would probably be gained. Lack of time leads to food court dining, fast food drive-ins, pizza, or nibbling all day on nutritionally weak snacks. Steamed vegetables, grilled fish and large salads are for January, not for December with its endless errands.

Frequent exercise classes or solitary workout routines followed by a shower, hair drying, and make-up applying is not compatible with a mind-set of counting down to Christmas.  And for those who exercise at home rather than at a health club, the convenience of having a piece of exercise equipment nearby is often ignored, because household tasks call more loudly than 30 minutes on the treadmill.

The approach to getting through the next few weeks without compromising sleep, weight, emotional well-being and fitness?

Schedule time to keep the body and mood healthy. You are not running a toy workshop in the North Pole and setting up a sleigh (rather than Amazon) delivery system by Dec 24. Which is to say that if there is a choice between getting enough sleep, or eating a salad, lean protein and high fiber carbohydrate, or taking a brisk walk or an exercise class, or making another dash to the mall, or baking one more batch of cookies? Choose exercise you want to do. Study after study has shown the positive and immediately impact that exercise has on decreasing stress and improving mood and cognition. Over the long term? Exercise can improve general health, decrease risks from heart disease, and perhaps even neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s.  A fatigued, stiff, grumpy body dragged to the gym unwillingly will not be the same after exercising. Paradoxically, the fatigue seems to lift….probably because increased blood flow oxygenates the muscles and brain. Stiffness from sitting in a car or standing in line goes away as the heat from the exercise makes the muscles more limber. Grumpiness disappears as well. People do not scowl at themselves in a health club; they may grunt or groan from the difficulty of their particular exercise, but somehow nasty moods go away (except if there are no towels when you leave the shower).

But the best part of literally (not figuratively) running or doing any other form of physical activity is that you are doing something for yourself. You are the beneficiary. You are the one who feels better, more energetic, less irritable or worried. The time you spend in exercise belongs to you.

Giving yourself the pre-holiday gift of time to take care of yourself is not something that is done easily. Guilt and anxiety over what has to be done, and what might not get done, may interfere with your healthy intentions: “I will make that salad or take a walk after I do (fill in the blank),” you say to yourself.

Putting your need for healthy food, exercise and sleep at the top of the long to-do list is hard. And yet, what better gift can you give to your family and friends than a cheerful, not sleepy, energetic, and unstressed you?

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