If Your Valentine Sweetheart is on a Diet, Should You Gift Chocolates?

Valentine ‘s Day is a sweet (pun intended) holiday. It comes in the middle of the winter doldrums; Christmas is long past and spring is nowhere to be seen. But the problem is that it also comes about six weeks into the weight-loss program many started after New Year’s Day.

“Give something to show your love,” we are told in a doughnut shop advertisement featuring heart- shaped pink doughnuts covered with white icing and pink sprinkles. Shelves in gourmet chocolate stores are filled with pinky-red, heart-shaped boxes decorated with tiny flowers; the boxes contain melt-in-your-mouth creamy chocolate that should be guaranteed to melt the heart of the recipient.  Russell Stover chocolates that are filed with hidden flavors revealed only when bitten into are waiting to be bought and sent to the relatives who remember the candy with fondness. M&M’s sport pink chocolate shells, while heart-shaped sugar candies waiting to cause instant tooth decay call to the drug store shopper who came in only looking for shampoo.

Not to be left out, bakeries feature several-layered heart-shaped cakes to be consumed with a glass or two of champagne.

To be sure, commercial romance for Valentine’s Day is not limited to food. Flowers are a welcome brightness in the gloom of early February and jewelry, especially diamond engagement rings, do not contain calories. Gifts of self-indulgence that the recipient may not get for her or himself, such as a massage, spa treatments, pedicures, and/or manicures, are also calorie-free and thoughtful.

However, sweet foods, especially chocolate, seem to be the most persistent symbol of romantic thoughts or intentions. Perhaps because for centuries chocolate has been considered an aphrodisiac. There is no scientific evidence for this, and even if it were true, there would be no reason to assume that chocolate consumed on Valentine’s Day has a greater impact on sexual arousal than if it were consumed on any other day. Perhaps if chocolate is wrapped in a heart-shaped box, it has more of an impact; nonetheless, this certainly has not been tested.

Giving a gift of chocolate also has its perils. What if the message it conveys has less to do with romantic intentions and more to do with the body image of the recipient? Give a pound of chocolate to someone skinny and it may convey the thought, “You need to gain some weight.”  Present that heart-shaped box to a chubby recipient and it can unintentionally convey the thought that, “You are fat already, so what difference does another pound of chocolate make?” instead of, “I like you the way you are.” Can you give chocolate to someone in the older generation who may be overweight, developing diabetes, or dealing with orthopedic problems because of excess weight?

Then there is the dieter. The continuing popularity of low or zero carbohydrate diets puts chocolate on the forbidden food list. The butterfat would be fine, and the more expensive the chocolate, the more butterfat it contains. But the sugar content that makes chocolate edible (otherwise it would taste like bitter cooking chocolate) would ruin the diet of anyone who is following a ketogenic diet in which fat, not carbohydrate, is used by the brain and body for energy.

But for those who are counting calories or the equivalent in food exchanges, there is good news. Small amounts of chocolate have fewer calories than they seem to have, given their luxurious taste and mouthfeel. A quick scan of Godiva, a popular gourmet brand of chocolate, reveals a lower calorie count for their chocolate than one would assume. Admittedly the actual pieces of chocolate are not large, maybe one or two bites. Still, you can eat four dark chocolate truffles for about 180 calories, and three pieces of assorted Belgian chocolates for 190 calories. A Lindt chocolate ball has 75 calories. To put this in perspective, a glass of champagne has 95 calories, an eight-ounce serving of fat-free yogurt around 80-90 calories, and 10 almonds, 70 calories. So certainly presenting your Valentine gift of chocolate to a dieter should not be a problem; one or two pieces of chocolate will not retard weight loss or cause the diet to fail.

But of course that is the problem. You can’t buy prepackaged chocolates wrapped in the colors of Valentine’s Day in amounts smaller than twenty or so pieces. Thus the recipient has to confront the problem of how to manage the consumption of the rest of the chocolate after February 14.  A highly disciplined dieter will be able to restrict consumption of a luscious piece of chocolate to one or possibly two a day. But this kind of restriction is not easy to accomplish, especially in the middle of the diet. And the romantic associations with the chocolate will be quickly dissipated when the dieter finds a “gift” of pounds after devouring the rest of the package.

One solution is to buy only one or two pieces of gourmet chocolate from the store; the chocolate can be boxed in the same fancy wrapping as would be used for a larger amount. But in this time of online rather than in person shopping, locating such shops and having the time to go to one seems much too inconvenient. Moreover, the dieter may misinterpret intentions behind the gift thinking that the giver:

1) Is cheap;

2) Thinks I am fat;

3) Thinks I will gobble everything in a bigger box; and therefore

4) Wants me to stay fat.

Maybe people should stick to flowers or diamonds.