Getting Nutrients from Food is So Old-Fashioned: Try an Intravenous Drip Instead!

I looked at the remaining drugstore-brand vitamin pills in the container and wondered whether I ought to continue taking them. A few days ago, an advertisement from a local plastic surgery/wellness/anti-aging spa offered a reduced rate for a procedure in which I could get an intravenous of vitamins and minerals.  According to the blurb that accompanied the offer, the “drip” would allow these essential nutrients to bypass my stomach and intestinal tract, and go directly into my blood thus avoiding the risk of some nutrients not being fully absorbed or altered by the digestive process. The promotional material promised an enhanced glow to my skin, better sleep, and increased energy.

A quick search on the Internet revealed that the intravenous procedures offered by this spa will be the “new” health procedure this year and to expect to see these “drip” spas becoming as ubiquitous as nail salons.  The benefits of receiving a vitamin-mineral infusion a couple of times a week were compelling, according to the web site advertisements. One company calls its preparation a, “brain booster” and recommends its infusion before examinations (studying might help also). Improving immune function is a standard objective of most of the vitamin -mineral infusions, although none of these clinics said to skip getting the flu vaccine. What if someone with the flu comes into the spa to boost immunity?  Should they get the vitamin infusion or go home to bed? This was not addressed.

Someone who really hates vegetables, rarely eats fruits, and dislikes swallowing vitamin pills might welcome the chance to lie on a recliner, listen to soft music and have vitamins and minerals pumped into his or her body every few days. Throw in a pedicure and it is a perfect day of self-renewal.  But why would someone want another type of infusion offered by this spa, namely an infusion of amino acids?  Amino acids are in every protein we eat, and the only people who might need an extraneous source of amino acids are those whose medical condition such as stomach cancer or severe gastrointestinal disease makes digesting protein difficult.  Vegan diets limit protein to plant sources of protein, and some foods may lack adequate amounts of specific amino acids. But so far, vegans have not been advised to skip the quinoa, and instead get an infusion of amino acids.

On the other hand, getting essential nutrients without relying on food might appeal to someone attempting to maintain a pathologically low weight (models, for example). The infusions of vitamins, minerals and amino acids would be a big improvement over a diet of calorie-free soda and cigarettes.

But of course going to infusion spas rather than eating is not sustainable or sensible. There is no provision for an energy source; no infusions of glucose or fat are provided by these clinics.  And it is absurd to equate the nutritional value of a synthetic mixture of vitamins and minerals with the nutritional complexity of micronutrients in food.

But what is disturbing about these spas/clinics offering these nutrient drips is that they are making the same spurious claims that health food restaurants have been making for years.  There is a popular health food restaurant near me promising everything except immortality for their smoothies. A neighbor told us that he did not get the flu vaccine because of one of the smoothies claimed to confer resistance to the flu virus.

A quick scan of some Internet sites promoting nutrient infusions seem to be making similar claims.  Some intravenous clinics offer a seemingly random assortment of amino acids, minerals and vitamins to overcome depression, halt compulsive behavior, improve sleep, decrease the symptoms of mental disorders like bipolar disorder, prevent the symptoms of PMS, help smoking cessation, and of course, weight loss.

These infusion bags of health have about as much scientific validity as products sold by so-called snake oil hucksters who promised their powders and drinks would cure everything. One could shrug off the IV spas as harmless, but they aren’t. The client would not know whether the amounts of vitamins or specific amino acid or minerals are in the range of safe intake, the client would not know if any medication he or she is taking might be adversely affected by these infusions, and whether he or she might experience side effects. When vitamins, minerals and amino acids enter the body by mouth, they slowly enter the body and some of the nutrients may not make it out of the digestive tract into the blood stream. So the dose of vitamins, for example, that gets into the body by mouth tends to be smaller than when coming from an intravenous solution. Moreover, does the client know how much of the vitamins, minerals, and amino acids are retained by the body or eliminated through the urine?  Are the people formulating the solutions medically knowledgeable about the diseases they are supposedly treating? Would they offer medical care if the solutions have no benefit? Do these clinics use licensed personnel to administer the drip? Is the environment sterile to avoid contamination? If someone has an adverse response like a severe allergic response, is there a medical team to handle this?

The most serious aspect of these heathy drips is that there is no validity to their claims, and in some cases, may prevent people from seeking credible medical help. No one is going to lose weight or relieve the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder or bipolar disorder with a drip of some vitamins and an amino acid. Relying on the “magic” of these drips, rather than interventions with scientific evidence supporting their utility, may work only because of a strong placebo effect. And if it does, that is fine. However, if we have truth in advertising, then the drips ought to be labeled “placebo” so the client knows what he or she is getting.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *