Valentine’s Day Chocolates: It Used to Be So Uncomplicated

When Richard Cadbury decided to package chocolates in heart-shaped boxes and sell them as gifts on Valentine’s Day in 1861, the most complicated result of his brilliant idea was difficulty in choosing a particular bonbon.  Should the chocolate be filled with chocolate or vanilla cream, chocolate truffle or a cherry in a cherry liquor? No one questioned the nutritional wisdom of eating a food whose ingredients included sugar, cocoa butter, full-cream milk powder, cocoa liquor, lecithin, vanilla and cocoa. Valentine’s Day was special and so was chocolate.

Jumping ahead many decades, chocolate Valentine’s Day gifts now have to be compatible with contemporary attitudes toward food. Chocolate itself has been clothed with health-giving properties; the darker, and often the more bitter, the better. Whatever ingredients chocolate contains to make it a health-giving food however, the amounts are really too small to make much of a difference (unless one eats a 3 ½ ounce chocolate bar containing a few hundred calories daily). But endowing chocolate with the same positive nutritional properties as say, kale…takes away the guilt at enjoying the delectable calories.

The most obvious nutritional hazard is the calories. Who should receive chocolates? Someone who is very thin? She or he probably wouldn’t eat them because it might cause weight gain. Someone who needs to lose weight? The gift conveys the message that the recipient is fat so what difference does it make if the gift makes her or him fatter. Is the giver saying, “I like you fat, so eat these chocolates?”

And then there are those whose personal eating profile makes eating a combination of sugar and fat problematic, so the type of chocolate edible presented as a gift might actually carry health risks. For example, there are many people these days with no tolerance for gluten or other chemicals found in grains, such as wheat and barley. There are others who cannot eat sugar, and still more who have embarked on a diet eliminating all carbohydrates.  None of these people can be the recipient of baked goods made with conventional wheat flour and, for some, sugar.

A friend of mine was in a quandary because she was making a special Valentine’s Day dinner for friends and learned that one of them was on a gluten-free regimen. However, he could eat small amounts of sugar. She searched the Internet for a flour-free chocolate cake and found a recipe with very positive reviews. Her only concern, as she told me later, was the combination of ingredients that made her wonder if she ought to have an EMT standing by when she served the cake.  She said, “I laid all the ingredients on the counter: two sticks of butter, six eggs, two cups of gourmet chocolate chips, sugar, and vanilla, and really thought aborting the recipe. I like this guy and didn’t want to send his cholesterol through the roof.”  She made the cake, which was delicious. She decided to serve such small portions that the heart-unfriendly ingredients couldn’t do much harm.

Since the gluten-sensitive guest could eat sugar and other carbohydrates, theoretically a Valentine’s dessert could have used ingredients like almond, rice or coconut flour. But what about those advocates of a totally carbohydrate-free way of eating? The so-called keto folk avoid carbohydrates entirely because they want their bodies to stop using glucose for energy and switch to using a byproduct of fat instead. Any morsel of carbohydrate that crosses their lips will cause the body to revert back to glucose. What is the giver of an edible Valentine gift going to do? Answer: Find or make foods that are mainly fat and sugar substitutes.

The popular keto diet limits the options, although not the calories. This diet forbids its users to eat carbohydrates in order to coerce the body into using a part of the fat molecule, fatty acids, for energy. These are converted into substances called ketones, and they supply energy formerly supplied by the natural source of energy in the body, glucose. The other half of the fat molecule, glycerol, is converted to glucose (don’t tell anyone) to be used for energy by the brain, which much prefers glucose to fat.  People on the keto diet may not know that this glucose is chemically identical to the glucose in chocolate or bran flakes or oatmeal when these foods are digested in the intestinal tract. What is worrisome about restricting intake to foods with little carbohydrate is that in addition to eliminating most of the fruits, vegetables, and high-fiber carbohydrates we should be eating, the foods can be extremely high in fat and calories. The Valentine Day’s keto edibles are a striking example.

Cheesecake sheathed in a chocolate shell, or drizzled with chocolate, is available commercially and as cheesecake itself is mainly cream cheese and sour cream (and in this case artificial sweetener), its high fat, sugar-free content makes it perfect for a keto Valentine food.  Peanut butter chocolate chip cookie dough works for all sorts of diets (raw, vegan, Paleo, gluten-free, sugar-free, grain-free) and looks like it would also be appropriate…but is not because it contains too much carbohydrate in the form coconut flour and almond flour. Most keto diet acceptable Valentine gifts have to be homemade and, like the flourless chocolate cake, may spread the waist while spreading love.  A chocolate truffle is made from cream cheese, cocoa powder and whipping cream. Chocolate hearts are made from coconut oil and cocoa powder, with artificial sweetener. Dipping bacon strips in chocolate makes a Valentine breakfast for your keto sweetheart’s breakfast or, if you live in England, you can buy a heart-shaped sausage from Marks and Spencer for the breakfast table.

Somehow these recipes don’t convey the traditional appeal of the old-fashioned Cadbury heart- shaped box and its many imitators.  Valentine’s Day was never meant to be celebrated by eating various cream cheese-based foods.

By definition, Valentine’ Day is a sweet holiday with a message of friendship, affection and love. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could take this day of uncomplicated messages to uncomplicate our dietary profiles as well? No one in 1861 receiving the first heart-shaped boxes of chocolate had to worry about whether eating the chocolates would throw the body into some sort of metabolic disaster. And why today should a person deciding what chocolate gift to buy for his or her sweetheart have to think about the food idiosyncrasies of the recipient?  Maybe, just as one hopes messages of friendship and love are not limited to February 14, one also hopes that a reasonable approach to eating can extend beyond the day as well.  Unless one has a medical reason to avoid certain foods, couldn’t we decide that foods that bring such pleasure and are associated with such positive emotions be allowed? After all, we don’t limit romance and love to one day. Why should we limit a piece of chocolate to one day either?

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *